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  List of freely available physics books

+ 22 like - 0 dislike
1887 views

I'm trying to amass a list of physics books with open-source licenses, like Creative Commons, GPL, etc. The books can be about a particular field in physics or about physics in general.

What are some freely available great physics books on the Internet? edit: I'm aware that there are tons of freely available lecture notes online. Still, it'd be nice to be able to know the best available free resources around.

As a starter: http://www.phys.uu.nl/~thooft/theorist.html


jump to list sorted by medium / type


Table of contents sorted by field (in alphabetical order):

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-05-04 15:38 (UCT), posted by SE-user pcr
asked Mar 1, 2011 in Resources and References by pcr (65 points) [ no revision ]
retagged May 4, 2014 by dimension10
Most voted comments show all comments
I think we should note that we should only include non-copyright-protected material.

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-05-04 15:38 (UCT), posted by SE-user Mark C
Some other good places to look are: "How to learn math and physics" by John Baez and StringWiki

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-05-04 15:38 (UCT), posted by SE-user Simon
See also the old post by Jacques Distler

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-05-04 15:38 (UCT), posted by SE-user Simon
@Simon the stringwiki link doesn't work

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-05-04 15:38 (UCT), posted by SE-user Approximist
See also freescienceonline.blogspot.com

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-05-04 15:38 (UCT), posted by SE-user pcr
@all I posted this in META how-to-organize-a-list-of-free-resources to seek a better organization of this material. The help of all of us, with ideas, could be important. My list is not mine it can be improved by anyone.

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-05-04 15:38 (UCT), posted by SE-user Helder Velez
I suggest we try putting some order into this post by turning the question into a table of contents (inspired by the meta.SO community FAQ. That will also require grouping the answers, but I think if we work on this together it will soon be worth the effort

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-05-04 15:38 (UCT), posted by SE-user Tobias Kienzler

24 Answers

+ 4 like - 0 dislike

Handbook of Quantum Information "an encyclopaedia of everything quantum"

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-05-04 15:39 (UCT), posted by SE-user pcr
answered Mar 2, 2011 by pcr (65 points) [ no revision ]
+ 4 like - 0 dislike

Fitzpatrick's The Physics of Plasmas is excellent. He also has notes on Classical Electromagnetism, Quantum Mechanics, and more, but I'm less familiar with these works.

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-05-04 15:39 (UCT), posted by SE-user Andrew
answered Mar 10, 2011 by Andrew (135 points) [ no revision ]
+ 3 like - 0 dislike

Chaos: Classical and Quantum, Cvitanovic´, Artuso, Mainieri, Vattay

Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy, Newton, translated by Motte

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-05-04 15:38 (UCT), posted by SE-user pcr
answered Mar 1, 2011 by pcr (65 points) [ no revision ]
+ 3 like - 0 dislike

Howard Georgi's The Physics of Waves

I wish someone would make the (now mostly out of print) Berkeley Physics Course volumes public domain. Or at least Dover could start cranking out cheap versions.

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-05-04 15:39 (UCT), posted by SE-user Anonymous Coward
answered Mar 1, 2011 by Anonymous Coward (40 points) [ no revision ]
+ 3 like - 0 dislike

Making, probing and understanding ultracold Fermi gases

"A review on superfluidity and the BEC-BCS crossover in ultracold Fermi gases."

Wolfgang Ketterle (Nobel 2001), Martin W. Zwierlein

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-05-04 15:39 (UCT), posted by SE-user pcr
answered Mar 2, 2011 by pcr (65 points) [ no revision ]
+ 3 like - 0 dislike

The FreeScience website links to a large listing of free books on a wide range of physics, math, and other fields of science.

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-05-04 15:40 (UCT), posted by SE-user user2696
answered Mar 21, 2011 by user2696 (0 points) [ no revision ]
+ 3 like - 0 dislike

Photonic Crystals: Molding the Flow of Light second edition

http://ab-initio.mit.edu/book/

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-05-04 15:40 (UCT), posted by SE-user pcr
answered Apr 21, 2011 by pcr (65 points) [ no revision ]
+ 2 like - 0 dislike

A nice set of books have been made available through project Gutenberg, are made available through the Open Ebooks Library, including:

Handbook of Formula and Physical constants

Space, Time and Gravitation - An Outline of the General Relativity Theory, Sir Arthur Stanley Eddington (beware of this book)

Relativity : the Special and General Theory, Albert Einstein

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-05-04 15:39 (UCT), posted by SE-user pcr
answered Mar 2, 2011 by pcr (65 points) [ no revision ]
+ 2 like - 0 dislike

Someone has mentioned the archive.org.

I have found Landau's Course of Theoretical Physics there, without Volumes 4 and 9.

You can also get Feynman's book on Quantum Electrodynamics there.

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-05-04 15:40 (UCT), posted by SE-user HPP
answered Sep 17, 2012 by HPP (0 points) [ no revision ]
very interesting. legal free online classic books.

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-05-04 15:40 (UCT), posted by SE-user pcr
+ 2 like - 0 dislike

I am a big fan of David Tong's lecture notes on Relativity, Classical Mechanics, QFT, Stat Mech, Soitons, String Theory and Kinetic theory available free.

http://www.damtp.cam.ac.uk/user/tong/teaching.html

I had learned classical mechanics first time as an undergrad from his notes, and I absolutely fell in love with it. The notes on QFT are also excellent to prep you for things like Peskin & Schroeder.

This post imported from StackExchange Physics at 2014-05-04 15:40 (UCT), posted by SE-user ramanujan_dirac
answered Feb 25, 2013 by ramanujan_dirac (235 points) [ no revision ]

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